UPDATE – UN: Khashoggi killing 'perpetrated by Saudi officials'

             ADDS DETAILS THROUGHOUT</p>  <p>By Fatih Hafiz Mehmet</p>  <p>ANKARA (AA) - The killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi in the kingdom's Istanbul Consulate was &quot;planned and perpetrated by Saudi officials,&quot; the UN special rapporteur said Thursday.</p>  <p>Agnes Callamard recently visited Turkey with a team of experts on an international inquiry into Khashoggi’s murder.</p>  <p>&quot;Evidence collected during my mission to Turkey shows prime facie case that Mr. Khashoggi was the victim of a brutal and premeditated killing, planned and perpetrated by officials of the State of Saudi Arabia,” Callamard was quoted as saying in a statement.</p>  <p>&quot;Turkey’s efforts to apply prompt; effective and thorough; independent and impartial; and transparent investigations -- in line with international law -- had been seriously curtailed and undermined by Saudi Arabia,&quot; she said. 

"Woefully inadequate time and access was granted to Turkish investigators to conduct a professional and effective crime-scene examination and search required by international standards for investigation."

  • 'Killing violates international law'

The killing violated "both international law and core rules of international relations, including the requirements for lawful use of diplomatic missions,” according to the statement.

"Guarantees of immunity were never intended to facilitate the commission of a crime and exonerate its authors of their criminal responsibility or to conceal a violation of the right to life. The circumstances of the killing and the response by State representatives in its aftermath may be described as ‘immunity for impunity’,” Callamard said.

She added Khashoggi's murder was the "gravest violation" of the most fundamental of all rights, the right to life.

"The murder of Jamal Khashoggi and the sheer brutality of it has brought irreversible tragedy to his loved ones. It is also raising a number of international implications which demand the urgent attention of the international community including the United Nations," Callamard said.

The statement added the UN team in Turkey met the foreign and justice ministers, intelligence chief, chief prosecutor of Istanbul and a number of other stakeholders, including from the civil society and the media community.

The visit from Jan. 28 to Feb. 3 was the Callamard’s first official visit to Turkey.

She thanked Turkey for its support during her visit for the international inquiry into the crime.

Investigations by the UN are ongoing, and Callamard’s final report will be presented to the Human Rights Council in June, the statement said.

Khashoggi, a contributor to The Washington Post, was killed at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2.

After producing various contradictory explanations, Riyadh acknowledged he was killed inside the consulate building, blaming the act on a botched rendition operation.

Turkey has sought the extradition of the Saudi citizens involved in the killing as well as a fuller accounting of the killing from Riyadh.

UN: Khashoggi killing 'perpetrated by Saudi officials'

             By Fatih Hafiz Mehmet</p>    <p>ANKARA (AA) - The last fall killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi in kingdom's Istanbul Consulate was &quot;planned and perpetrated by Saudi officials&quot;, UN special rapporteur said on Thursday.</p>    <p>Agnes Callamard, the UN special rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions, recently visited Turkey with a team of experts in an international inquiry into killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi.</p>    <p>&quot;Evidence collected during my mission to Turkey shows prime facie case that Mr. Khashoggi was the victim of a brutal and premeditated killing, planned and perpetrated by officials of the State of Saudi Arabia,” Callamard was quoted as saying in a statement.</p>    <p>Callamard added: &quot;Turkey’s efforts to apply prompt; effective and thorough; independent and impartial; and transparent investigations -- in line with international law -- had been seriously curtailed and undermined by Saudi Arabia.&quot;</p>    <p>According to the statement, the killing of Khashoggi violated &quot;both international law and core rules of international relations, including the requirements for lawful use of diplomatic missions&quot;.</p>    <p>Callamard also thanked Turkey for its support during her visit to the country over international inquiry into crime.</p>    <p>Khashoggi, a contributor to The Washington Post, was killed at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2.</p>    <p>After producing various contradictory explanations, Riyadh acknowledged he was killed inside the consulate building, blaming the act on a botched rendition operation. </p>  <p>Turkey has sought the extradition of the Saudi citizens involved in the killing as well as a fuller accounting of the killing from Riyadh.

Top US college slams Khashoggi murder; keeps Saudi ties

             By Umar Farooq</p>  <p>WASHINGTON (AA) - The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on Wednesday said it would not severe its ties with Saudi Arabia but the school condemned the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.</p>  <p>&quot;MIT utterly condemns such brutal human rights violations, discrimination and suppression of dissent, including the murder of Jamal Khashoggi,&quot; President Rafael Reif said in a letter.</p>  <p>Some students, faculty and members of the MIT community demanded the university end its relationship with the kingdom after Khashoggi was killed inside the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul last October.</p>  <p>After initially denying a role in the journalist's death, Saudi Arabia changed its story and blamed the killing on a botched rendition operation.</p>  <p>Reif said he shared the &quot;sense of horror&quot; at the killing but had no intentions of cutting engagements with Saudi Arabia, saying the kingdom sponsored research and education programs for the university.</p>  <p>Last year, the Saudi state oil company, Aramco, pledged $25 million to the university for an energy research project.</p>  <p>&quot;My experience leads me to see our Saudi engagements differently, and therefore to believe that cutting off these longstanding faculty-led relationships abruptly in midstream is not the best course of action,&quot; said Reif.</p>  <p>He said the university will establish an advisory committee to review international engagement with other governments. This committee will review future partnerships and also look at ones that are up for renewal.</p>  <p>&quot;I have come to know many Saudi citizens, including MIT alumni, Saudi officials and industry leaders working to modernize Saudi society,” said Reif. “I have also met Saudi students and postdocs, both women and men, who dream of helping their society participate in and contribute to the global scientific community.&quot;

Anadolu Agency publishes book on Saudi journo

By Baris Gundogan

ANKARA (AA) – Anadolu Agency has published a book on a Saudi journalist who was killed in Istanbul last fall.

The book has complete details of the murder of Jamal Khasoggi, a contributor to Washington Post, who went missing after entering the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul.

The book published in English, Turkish and Arabic includes developments related to the murder in the shape of news stories, photographs, infographics and analysis.

It opens with his biography and contributions as journalist.

It also includes Khashoggi's views on the civil war in Yemen and the Saudi government.

The book briefs about teams from Saudi Arabia which came to the consulate before and after the murder.

The family tree of Saudi royals is also part of the book.

Senol Kazanci, director general of Anadolu Agency, wrote the foreword of the book and said Turkey has a special responsibility as the murder occurred on its territory.

"We are indebted to Khashoggi's works. We published this book as professional loyalty to him. We underline that we will neither forget this murder nor let it be forgotten," he said.

Khashoggi went missing after entering the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2, 2018.

After producing various contradictory explanations, Riyadh acknowledged that he was killed inside the consulate building, blaming the act on a botched rendition operation.

Turkey has sought the extradition of the Saudi citizens involved in the killing as well as a fuller accounting of the killing from Riyadh.

Saudi Arabia cannot restore global reputation: report

By Umar Farooq

WASHINGTON (AA) – Saudi Arabia should not be allowed to resume normal relations with the rest of the world until the kingdom "puts on more than a show of change" after the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, The Washington Post's Editorial Board said in an opinion piece.

Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman has been widely criticized after the killing of Khashoggi, a contributor for The Post, in the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2. After the Saudi government initially denied responsibility, it switched its story a few times before blaming the murder on a botched rendition operation.

"The 33-year-old crown prince has suppressed real and perceived opponents with a brutality that is unprecedented in Saudi history, culminating in the murder and dismemberment of journalist Jamal Khashoggi," the editorial board said Saturday.

The international community refused to accept the Saudis’ claim that the incident was not a premeditated murder.

Agnes Callamard, the UN special rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions, is leading an international inquiry into the killing of Khashoggi.

"The regime promised accountability for the Khashoggi killing, but in practice continues to stonewall," the board wrote. "Special rapporteur Agnes Callamard, this last week was denied access to the crime scene at the Saudi Consulate when she visited Istanbul."

The Post outlined the measures taken by the country to try and restore its international reputation, including the release of one of the most prominent businessman it detained, Amr Dabbagh, as well as staging an investment conference seeking $426 billion in private investment, and bringing in singer Mariah Carey to perform a concert.

"The objective here is clear: to resume normal commerce between Saudi Arabia and the democratic world, and attract desperately needed investment, without meaningful change in the regime controlled by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. It’s in the interest of the United States and its allies, as well as Saudi Arabia itself, that this strategy fail," the board wrote.

The Post said that in the midst of everything happening in Saudi Arabia, U.S. President Donald Trump seems to be fine with it. However, if Trump continues to normalize relations with the kingdom and bin Salman after the killing of Khashoggi, it will have "bad long-term consequences."

"Mohammed bin Salman’s apologists frequently speak of the need to preserve 'stability' in the kingdom. But it is unstable now, and becoming more so. The best way to foster genuine equilibrium is for Western governments, investors and entertainers to shun the regime until it puts on more than a show of change," the board wrote.

UN expert in Istanbul probing Khashoggi murder

             By Emin Ileri</p>  <p>ISTANBUL (AA) - A UN official investigating the killing of a Saudi journalist held a closed-door, two-hour meeting in a hotel in Sisli district here with officials, journalists and NGOs Wednesday. </p>  <p>Agnes Callamard, the UN special rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions, is leading a team of experts in an international inquiry into Jamal Khashoggi’s murder.</p>  <p>Journalist and author of the book, &quot;Diplomatic Savagery- Dark Secrets of Jamal Khashoggi Murder,&quot; Ferhat Unlu, said the UN asked about the process from the time of the murder until today.</p>  <p>The UN asked about the investigation of the prosecutorship, the police and the intelligence over the murder, said Unlu.</p>  <p>&quot;They asked very specific questions and we answered as much as we can,&quot; Unlu added.</p>  <p>Callamard will be in Turkey through Saturday.</p>  <p>Khashoggi, a contributor to The Washington Post, was killed at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2.</p>  <p>After producing various contradictory explanations, Riyadh acknowledged he was killed inside the consulate building, blaming the act on a botched rendition operation.</p>  <p>Turkey has sought the extradition of Saudi involved in the killing as well as a fuller accounting of the killing from Riyadh.

UN to assess ‘governments' steps’ on Khashoggi case

             <p>By Bayram Altug and Bahattin Gonultas<br> <br> DAVOS, Switzerland (AA) – A UN official on extrajudicial executions will assess the “steps taken by governments to address and respond” to the killing of a Saudi journalist in Istanbul, and launch an international inquiry, the United Nations said on Friday. <br> <br> In a statement, the UN’s Human Rights Office of the High Commissioner said that Agnes Callamard, the UN’s special rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions, will head an international inquiry into the killing last fall in Istanbul of Jamal Khashoggi, starting with a visit to Turkey from Jan. 28 to Feb. 3. <br> <br> Callamard will “assess the steps taken by governments to address and respond to the killing, and the nature and extent of states’ and individuals’ responsibilities for the killing,” the statement said. <br> <br> “The inquiry will also seek to identify ways by which states can strengthen fulfillment of their international commitments to protect the right to life, prevent violations and ensure accountability,” the statement quoted Callamard as saying. <br> <br> This inquiry was established at Callamard’s request, the statement added.<br> <br> The probe will “review and evaluate, from a human rights perspective, the circumstances surrounding the killing of Khashoggi,” the statement said, adding: “Callamard will be accompanied by Baroness Helena Kennedy, QC, and Professor Duarte Nuno Vieira from the University of Coimbra [Portugal].”<br> <br> On Thursday, Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu reiterated that Turkey is carrying out a transparent process on the case and that it is important to expose the culprits in the killing.<br> <br> Citing Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s remarks calling for an international probe of the case, Cavusoglu said Callamard would visit Turkey at the end of January.<br> <br> Khashoggi, a contributor to The Washington Post, was killed at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2.<br> <br> After producing various contradictory explanations, Riyadh acknowledged he was killed inside the consulate building, blaming the act on a botched rendition operation. <br> <br> Turkey has sought the extradition of the Saudi citizens involved in the killing as well as a fuller accounting of the killing from Riyadh.</p>  <p> </p><br>