Huawei exec remains behind bars in Canada

            By Barry Ellsworth </p>  <p>TRENTON, Canada (AA) – A second day of court Monday brought no resolution to the question of whether a senior executive of Chinese tech giant Huawei would be granted bail, with the hearing resuming tomorrow. </p>  <p>The arrest of the company’s chief financial officer, Meng Wanzhou, on Dec. 1 at Vancouver International Airport was at the request of the American government. The U.S. wants Meng, the daughter of Huawei’s founder and chief executive Ren Zhengfei, extradited to the U.S. to face fraud charges. </p>  <p>A bail hearing Friday was extended to Monday and Meng spent the weekend in a Canadian jail. </p>  <p>Huawei is suspected of operating a subsidiary company that Meng maintained as a separate firm and then used that company to illegally do business with Iran in violation of U.S. sanctions. </p>  <p>Her lawyer, David Martin, argued Monday that although she had access to substantial sums of money, she is not a flight risk because his client “is a woman of character and dignity” and “deeply respectful of the rule of law”. </p>  <p>He also said she would not flee because it would embarrass the Chinese government. </p>  <p>Martin proposed that if Meng was granted bail, she would submit to electronic monitoring and that a private security team would follow her while she would pay the costs. He also said she would reside at her Vancouver home while her case proceeded. </p>  <p>Her arrest in Vancouver on Saturday brought a sharp rebuke from the Chinese government. </p>  <p>It also sent stock markets plunging over fears the incident would kill a temporary trade war ceasefire brokered by U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping. </p>  <p>Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told reporters Thursday that politics did not play a role in Meng’s arrest for possible extradition to the United States. </p>  <p>U.S. authorities asked for Canada to detain Meng and Thursday, U.S. National Security Adviser John Bolton said he also knew in advance of the arrest. </p>  <p>The tension with Beijing has prompted Canada to prepare for a possible cyber attack from China on its communication network. </p>  <p>Huawei is the world’s largest supplier of telecommunications network equipment and second-biggest maker of smartphones behind Samsung.

No point for me to listen to Khashoggi tape: Bolton

By Umar Farooq

WASHINGTON (AA) – National Security Adviser John Bolton said Tuesday there was no need for him to listen to an audio recording of the murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi because he does not speak Arabic.

Bolton made the comments to reporters at the White House, engaging in a brief back and forth with one reporter who asked why he had not listened to the recording.

"I'm just trying to make the point that everybody who says, 'Why don't you listen to the tape?'…unless you speak Arabic, what are you going to get from it?" he said.

U.S. President Donald Trump has also not listened to the tape, saying he had been fully briefed on it and there was no reason to hear it.

Trump has come under criticism after dismissing reports that the CIA concluded with high confidence that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman ordered the killing of Khashoggi, saying "maybe he did, maybe he didn't!"

Khashoggi, a Saudi journalist and columnist for The Washington Post, went missing after entering the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2.

After initially saying he had left the consulate alive, the Saudi administration admitted weeks later that he was killed there.

The U.S. imposed sanctions on 17 Saudi officials who were allegedly involved in Khashoggi’s murder, but Trump noted that the U.S. intends to remain a close ally of the Kingdom.

"The United States intends to remain a steadfast partner of Saudi Arabia to ensure the interests of our country, Israel and all other partners in the region," he said in a statement.

UPDATE – Turkey gives list of 84 FETO members to US: Cavusoglu

ADDS MORE REMARKS

By Fatih Hafiz Mehmet, Safvan Allahverdi and Muhammed Bilal Kenasari

ANKARA (AA) – Turkey has given the United States a list of 84 members of the Fetullah Terrorist Organization (FETO) that it wants American authorities to extradite, the nation's foreign minister said Tuesday.

Speaking to Turkish reporters at Ankara's embassy in Washington, Mevlut Cavusoglu said he delivered the list to his American counterpart, Mike Pompeo, and White House national security advisor John Bolton.

Earlier, Cavusoglu and Pompeo held a 45-minute meeting at the State Department, where they discussed bilateral and regional issues as well as the murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

FETO and its U.S.-based leader Fetullah Gulen orchestrated the defeated coup in Turkey on July 15, 2016 which left 251 people martyred and nearly 2,200 injured.

Ankara also accuses FETO of being behind a long-running campaign to overthrow the state through the infiltration of Turkish institutions, particularly the military, police and judiciary.

Turning to Khashoggi's killing, Cavusoglu said there are unanswered questions and Turkey is insisting that details regarding the murder be clarified, including who ordered Khashoggi's murder.

"Many countries do not want to harm their relations with Saudi Arabia because of the Khashoggi murder. Neither do we. However, the murder must be uncovered," he said.

Cavusoglu added that Turkey does not view the Khashoggi incident as a political matter.

Khashoggi, a Saudi journalist and columnist for The Washington Post, went missing after entering the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2.

After initially saying he left the consulate alive, the Saudi administration admitted weeks later that he was killed there.

Speaking about U.S. sanctions on Iran, Cavusoglu noted that granting Turkey a waiver for Iranian oil imports is important, but it should be permanent and comprehensive.

The second wave of renewed U.S. sanctions on OPEC's third largest exporter officially came into force Nov. 5 targeting Iran's energy, shipbuilding, shipping and financial sectors.

The Trump administration also granted China, Greece, India, Turkey, Italy, Japan, South Korea and Taiwan a 180-day waiver for Iranian oil imports.

Meanwhile, Cavusoglu said that in the coming days, Turkey and the U.S. will come together and discuss how to implement the roadmap for Manbij in other regions.

On Nov. 1, Turkish and U.S. troops began joint patrols in Manbij, northeast of the Aleppo Governorate in Syria, as part of an agreement that focuses on the withdrawal of YPG/PKK terrorists from the city to stabilize the region.

Turkey gives list of 84 FETO members to US: Cavusoglu

By Fatih Hafiz Mehmet

ANKARA (AA) – Turkey has given the United States a list of 84 members of the Fetullah Terrorist Organization (FETO) that it wants American authorities to extradite, said the nation's foreign minister.

Speaking to Turkish reporters at Ankara's embassy in Washington, Mevlut Cavusoglu said he delivered the list to his American counterpart, Mike Pompeo, and White House national security adviser John Bolton.

Earlier, Cavusoglu and Pompeo held a 45-minute meeting at the State Department, where they discussed bilateral and regional issues as well as the murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

FETO and its U.S.-based leader Fetullah Gulen orchestrated the defeated coup in Turkey on July 15, 2016 which left 251 people martyred and nearly 2,200 injured.

Ankara also accuses FETO of being behind a long-running campaign to overthrow the state through the infiltration of Turkish institutions, particularly the military, police and judiciary.

Turning to Khashoggi's killing, Cavusoglu said there are unanswered questions and Turkey is insisting that details regarding the murder be clarified, including who ordered Khashoggi's murder.

"Many countries do not want to harm their relations with Saudi Arabia because of the Khashoggi murder. Neither do we. However, the murder must be uncovered," he said.

Cavusoglu added that Turkey does not view the Khashoggi incident as a political matter.

Khashoggi, a Saudi journalist and columnist for The Washington Post, went missing after entering the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2.

After initially saying he left the consulate alive, the Saudi administration admitted weeks later that he was killed there.

ABD'den Kaşıkçı cinayetini örtbas sinyali

WASHINGTON (AA) – Beyaz Saray Ulusal Güvenlik Danışmanı John Bolton, Suudi gazeteci Cemal Kaşıkçı'nın öldürülmesiyle ilgili kayıtların Suudi Veliaht Prensi Muhammed bin Selman'ın dahlini işaret etmediğini savundu.

33. Güneydoğu Asya Uluslar Birliği (ASEAN) Zirvesi için Singapur'da bulunan Bolton, burada gazetecilere yaptığı açıklamada, kayıtları dinleyenlerin, işin içinde Suudi Veliaht Prensi olduğu sonucuna varmadığını ileri sürdü.

Bolton, ABD Başkanı Donald Trump'ın, Kaşıkçı'nın öldürüldüğü 2 Ekim'de İstanbul'daki Suudi Başkonsolosluğunda neler yaşandığıyla ilgili gerçeği öğrenmek istediğini belirterek, "Kaydı kendim dinlemedim, ancak dinleyenlerin değerlendirmesi, herhangi bir suretle, cinayetle Veliaht Prensi ilişkilendirmiyor." diye konuştu.

Cumhurbaşkanı Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, Kaşıkçı'nın öldürülmesi ile ilgili 10 Kasım'da yaptığı açıklamada, kayıtların, konuşmaların, Suudi Arabistan, ABD, Almanya, Fransa ve İngiltere'ye dinlettirildiğini açıklamıştı.

Amerikan The New York Times (NYT) gazetesi,Kaşıkçı suikasti için Türkiye'ye gelen 15 kişiden birinin cinayetten kısa süre sonra yaptığı telefon görüşmesinde, Veliaht Prens Muhammed bin Selman'ı kastederek, "Patronunuza söyleyin, adamlar işlerini bitirdi." dediği iddiasına yer vermişti.

US sends shot over bow at Cuba, Venezuela, Nicaragua

By Michael Hernandez

WASHINGTON (AA) – The U.S. "will stand with the freedom fighters" arrayed against a trio of Latin American countries the U.S. has accused of widespread rights abuses, National Security Advisor John Bolton said Thursday.

"The troika of tyranny in this Hemisphere — Cuba, Venezuela, and Nicaragua — has finally met its match," Bolton said at Miami's Freedom Tower, according to a copy of his remarks obtained by Anadolu Agency.

"This triangle of terror stretching from Havana to Caracas to Managua is the cause of immense human suffering, the impetus of enormous regional instability, and the genesis of a sordid cradle of communism in the Western Hemisphere," he said.

"The people of Cuba, Venezuela, and Nicaragua are fearsome opponents, and if I were [Miguel] Diaz-Canel, [Nicolas] Maduro, or [Daniel] Ortega, I would fear their virtuous power," he added, referring to the presidents of Cuba, Venezuela and Nicaragua.

As Bolton made his remarks, U.S. President Donald Trump signed an executive order containing new sanctions on Venezuela, which Bolton called "tough" and said they target the country's "networks operating within corrupt Venezuelan economic sectors and deny them access to stolen wealth."

The order specifically opens the door to sanctions on individuals working in the country’s gold sector, as well as individuals accused of engaging in corruption and deceptive practices in other sectors.

The Treasury Department agency responsible for implementing sanctions said on its website it "expects to use its discretion to target in particular those who operate corruptly in the gold or other identified sectors of the Venezuela economy, and not those who are operating legitimately in such sectors."

Bolton alleged the Venezuelan government has used the country's gold sector "as a bastion to finance illicit activities, to fill its coffers, and to support criminal groups."

"The United States will not tolerate Maduro’s undermining of democratic institutions and ruthless violence against innocent civilians," Bolton said.

Returning to the trio of Latin American countries, Bolton said Washington "looks forward to watching each corner of the triangle fall: in Havana, in Caracas, in Managua."

The comments are some of the harshest since Trump refused to rule out military action against Venezuela in August. It was followed by a New York Times report in September that said the U.S. held secret talks with Venezuelan military officials at odds with the government, and Trump insisted that month that "all options are on the table, every one."

Bolton meanwhile embraced a series of right-wing populist politicians who have won recent elections, including incoming Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro and Colombian President Ivan Duque, describing them as "likeminded leaders."

Their elections, Bolton said, "are positive signs for the future of the region, and demonstrate a growing regional commitment to free-market principles, and open, transparent, and accountable governance."

Russia, US agree to expand coordination in Syria

By Elena Teslova

MOSCOW (AA) – Russia and the U.S. agreed to expand the coordination in Syria on all issues, U.S. National Security Adviser John Bolton said on Tuesday.

Speaking at a news conference following his two-day visit to Moscow, he said Syria was a key topic of discussion.

Commenting on organizing a demilitarized zone in the Syrian province of Idlib, he said a memorandum between Russia and Turkey is being implemented.

"As for Idlib, we discussed this topic. I repeated what President Trump said about the need to avoid a humanitarian disaster there.

"The agreement between Russia, Syria and Turkey is being implemented, although many unresolved issues remain. Idlib is one of the issues in the Syrian conflict," he said.

Following a meeting in Sochi last month between Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin, the two countries agreed to establish the Idlib demilitarized zone.

Ankara and Moscow also signed a memorandum of understanding calling for the “stabilization” of Idlib's de-escalation zone, in which acts of aggression are expressly prohibited.

Under the deal, opposition groups in Idlib will remain in areas in which they are already present, while Russia and Turkey will conduct joint patrols in the area with a view to preventing renewed fighting.

Syria has only just begun to emerge from a devastating conflict that began in 2011 when the Assad regime cracked down on demonstrators with unexpected ferocity.​

Trump warns of nuke arsenal ramp-up after axing pact

By Michael Hernandez

WASHINGTON (AA) – U.S. President Donald Trump threatened Monday to build up America’s nuclear arsenal "until people come to their senses".

The comments come after Trump's weekend announcement that Washington would be exiting the landmark 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty which eliminated all U.S. and Russian nuclear missiles with ranges of 310-3,420 miles (500-5,500 kilometers) and their launchers, citing alleged Russian violations of the pact.

"Russia has not adhered to the agreement," Trump said Monday during remarks to reporters at the White House.

"We have more money than anybody else by far. We’ll build it up until they come to their senses. When they do, then we’ll all be smart. And we’ll all stop. And by the way, not only stop, we’ll reduce, which I would love to do. But right now, they have not adhered to the agreement,” he added.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said Monday that Washington has yet to initiate the legal procedure for withdrawal from the treaty, but National Security Advisor John Bolton is expected to formally notify Moscow of the decision during his visit to Russia.

Trump said his threat to increase the U.S. nuclear arsenal is aimed at "whoever you want," including China, who is not a signatory to the INF. The agreement was signed bilaterally between Russia and the U.S.

China is not a party to the agreement and therefore is not restricted in the development of its nuclear arsenal.

The threat, Trump said, "includes anybody else that wants to play that game”.

"China’s not included in the agreement. They should be included in the agreement," he said. "Until they get smart, there will be nobody that’s going to be even close to us."

Trump said he has not spoken to Russian President Vladimir Putin about his decision to leave the treaty, arguing he does not have to.

"I don’t have to speak. I’m terminating the agreement because they violated the agreement," he said.

US national security adviser to visit Russia

By Elena Teslova

MOSCOW (AA) – U.S. National Security Adviser John Bolton will visit Moscow on Oct.22-23, according to a Russian state-run news agency on Friday.

During his trip, he will meet with the head of the Russian Security Council Nikolay Patrushev, RIA news agency quoted a diplomatic source as saying.

Earlier, Bolton tweeted that he will be on a tour to several post-Soviet countries — including Russia, Azerbaijan, Armenia and Georgia — starting on Oct.20.

Trump rolls out new US counterterrorism strategy

WASHINGTON (AA) – The White House introduced a new counterterrorism strategy Thursday that it said is "much broader" than that of former U.S. President Barack Obama's plan.

President Donald Trump's new strategy is the first since Obama rolled out his plan in 2011.

National Security Advisor John Bolton told reporters at the White House the new measure recognizes "that there's a terrorist ideology that we're confronting, and I think it's long been the president's view that without recognizing that we're in an ideological struggle, that we can't properly address the terrorist threat."

While adopting rhetoric that the Obama administration insisted was unhelpful in the fight against terrorism, the new strategy reflects in many ways aspects of Obama's plan, as well as that of President George W. Bush.

"Today's terrorist landscape is more fluid and complex than ever," the report said. "While we have succeeded in disrupting large-scale attacks in the homeland since 2001, we have not sufficiently mitigated the overall threat that terrorists pose."

The plan seeks to "dismantle" militant networks, and "sever" them from their sources of strength while maintaining pressure on the organizations to prevent their reemergence.

It also sought to prioritize "non-military capabilities," including the prevention of recruitment, and efforts to push back on online propaganda.

"This includes leveraging the skills and resources of civil society and non-traditional partners to diminish terrorists’ efforts to radicalize and recruit people in the United States," it said.

The report's emphasis on Iran is a reflection of Bolton, who has long taken a hawkish approach to the Islamic Republic and has continued to do so after assuming his White House post in April.

While addressing reporters he called Tehran "the world's central banker of international terrorism" following its 1979 revolution, and said it supports a range of militant groups in the region that "continue to pose a threat to the United States and our interests."