UPDATE 2 – Trump exerts privilege over unredacted Mueller report

                                               ADDS CONTEMPT VOTE IN GRAFS 6-7; MOVES UP LAST GRAF AND REFRAMES</p>  <p>By Michael Hernandez</p>  <p>WASHINGTON (AA) - U.S. President Donald Trump exerted executive privilege Wednesday on the unredacted version of Special Counsel Robert Mueller's report on Russian interference in the 2016 election.</p>  <p>The House Judiciary Committee subpoenaed the Justice Department for an unredacted copy of the report as well as all underlying evidence. Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler had set a Monday deadline for the department to comply, but it came and passed as the committee and the department continued talks to breach the impasse.</p>  <p>Those discussions broke down late Tuesday. </p>  <p>Nadler said the president decided to invoke privilege on the document as the committee prepared to hold Attorney General William Barr in contempt of Congress for failing to adhere to the subpoena.</p>  <p>&quot;The department seemed open to sharing these documents with us just yesterday. This decision represents a clear escalation in the Trump administration's blanket defiance of Congress' constitutionally-mandated duties,&quot; Nadler said ahead of the contempt vote.</p>  <p>The committee voted 24-16 later Wednesday to hold Barr in contempt, sending the matter to the full House where the Democratic majority will likely follow suit and trigger a criminal referral to the U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia.</p>  <p>Jessie Liu, the U.S. attorney, would then decide whether a prosecution would be pursued. </p>  <p>Barr released a redacted version of the Mueller report to Congress and the public last month, but Democrats have insisted on receiving an uncensored copy.</p>  <p>The White House sharply criticized Nadler, saying in a statement that &quot;neither the White House nor Attorney General Barr will comply with Chairman Nadler’s unlawful and reckless demands.</p>  <p>&quot;Faced with Chairman Nadler’s blatant abuse of power, and at the Attorney General’s request, the President has no other option than to make a protective assertion of executive privilege,&quot; spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said in a statement. 

Trump'tan Rusya soruşturması raporuna başkanlık müdahalesi

WASHINGTON (AA) – ABD Başkanı Donald Trump, özel yetkili savcı Robert Mueller'ın Rusya soruşturması üzerine hazırladığı raporun Kongre'ye ulaşmasını engellemek için başkanlık yetkisini kullandı.

ABD Temsilciler Meclisi Adalet Komitesi, Adalet Bakanlığından özel yetkili savcı Mueller tarafından Rusya'nın 2016 başkanlık seçimlerine müdahalesine yönelik hazırlanan orijinal raporu istedi.

Bakanlığın, söz konusu raporu komiteye teslim etmesi için pazartesiye kadar süre verilmesine rağmen, raporu ulaştırmadığı belirtildi.

Buna sebep olarak Komite Başkanı Jerry Nadler, Trump'ın raporun komiteye teslim edilmemesi için başkanlık yetkisini kullandığını duyurdu.

Nadler, "Bakanlık dün bu belgeleri bizimle paylaşmaya açık görünüyordu. Bu karar, Trump yönetiminin Kongre’nin anayasal sorumluluklarına karşı oluşturduğu net bir gerginliktir." dedi.

Beyaz Saray Sözcüsü Sarah Sanders ise konuya ilişkin yazılı bir açıklama yaparak, şu ifadeleri kullandı:

"Amerikan halkı, Komite Başkanı Nadler'in bu tarz çaresiz girişimlerle, Başkan Trump'ın yükselen ekonomimizde elde ettiği tarihi başarıyı gizlemeye çalıştığının farkında. Ne Beyaz Saray, ne de Adalet Bakanı William Barr komite başkanı Nadler'in bu hukuksuz ve pervasız isteklerine boyun eğmeyecektir. Nadler'in gücünü kötüye kullanması sebebi ve Adalet Bakanı'nın talebiyle, Başkan'ın bu konuda başkanlık yetkisini kullanmaktan başka seçeneği yoktu."

Adalet Bakanı Barr, söz konusu Mueller raporunun düzenlenmiş halini geçen ay Kongre'ye sunmuş ancak Demokratlar raporun sansürsüz bir kopyasını almak için ısrarcı olmuşlardı.

Adalet Komitesi'nin bir sonraki adım olarak, Barr'a Kongre'nin talimatlarına itaat etmediği gerekçesiyle soruşturma açması bekleniyor.

UPDATE – Trump exerts privilege over unredacted Mueller report

                              ADDS WHITE HOUSE STATEMENT, DETAILS THROUGHOUT</p>  <p>By Michael Hernandez</p>  <p>WASHINGTON (AA) - U.S. President Donald Trump exerted executive privilege Wednesday on the unredacted version of Special Counsel Robert Mueller's report on Russian interference in the 2016 election. </p>  <p>The House Judiciary Committee subpoenaed the Justice Department for an unredacted copy of the report as well as all underlying evidence. Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler had set a Monday deadline for the department to comply, but it came and passed as the committee and the department continued talks to breach the impasse.</p>  <p>Those discussions broke down late Tuesday. </p>  <p>Nadler said the president decided to invoke privilege on the document as the committee prepared to hold Attorney General William Barr in contempt of Congress for failing to adhere to the subpoena.</p>  <p>&quot;The department seemed open to sharing these documents with us just yesterday. This decision represents a clear escalation in the Trump administration's blanket defiance of Congress' constitutionally-mandated duties,&quot; Nadler said ahead of the contempt vote.</p>  <p>Barr released a redacted version of the Mueller report to Congress and the public last month, but Democrats have insisted on receiving an uncensored copy.</p>  <p>The White House sharply criticized Nadler, saying in a statement that &quot;neither the White House nor Attorney General Barr will comply with Chairman Nadler’s unlawful and reckless demands.</p>  <p>&quot;Faced with Chairman Nadler’s blatant abuse of power, and at the Attorney General’s request, the President has no other option than to make a protective assertion of executive privilege,&quot; spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said in a statement. </p>  <p>The Judiciary Committee is likely to vote in favor of holding Barr in contempt of Congress when it votes later Wednesday, sending the matter to the full House where the Democratic majority will likely follow suit and send the matter to the U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia. 

Trump exerts privilege over unredacted Mueller report

             By Michael Hernandez </p>  <p>WASHINGTON (AA) - U.S. President Donald Trump exerted executive privilege Wednesday on the unredacted version of Special Counsel Robert Mueller's report on Russian interference in the 2016 election. </p>  <p>The House Judiciary Committee subpoenaed the Justice Department for an unredacted copy of the report as well as all underlying evidence. Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler had set a Monday deadline for the department to comply.</p>  <p>But Nadler said the president decided to invoke privilege over the document as the committee prepared to hold Attorney General William Barr in contempt of Congress for failing to adhere to the subpoena.</p>  <p>&quot;The department seemed open to sharing these documents with us just yesterday. This decision represents a clear escalation in the Trump administration's blanket defiance of Congress' constitutionally-mandated duties,&quot; Nadler said.

Trump fumes at Mueller after claiming exoneration

            By Michael Hernandez</p>  <p>WASHINGTON (AA) - U.S. President Donald Trump raged Friday at Special Counsel Robert Mueller's final report on Russian interference, one day after he claimed total exoneration.</p>  <p>&quot;Statements are made about me by certain people in the Crazy Mueller Report, in itself written by 18 Angry Democrat Trump Haters, which are fabricated &amp; totally untrue,&quot; Trump said on Twitter. &quot;It was not necessary for me to respond to statements made in the “Report” about me, some of which are total bulls**t &amp; only given to make the other person look good (or me to look bad).&quot;</p>  <p>The president's comments are a far cry from his claim shortly before the report was made public that Mueller's team's work proved there was &quot;No collusion. No obstruction.&quot;</p>  <p>While the special counsel determined there was a lack of evidence linking the Trump campaign to Russia's attempts to sway the 2016 election in Trump's favor, it was not as clear-cut on obstruction as the president suggested. </p>  <p>&quot;The evidence we obtained about the President’s actions and intent presents difficult issues that would need to be resolved if we were making a traditional prosecutorial judgment,&quot; Mueller wrote, noting he is not doing so based on department practice and significant constitutional latitude given to presidents on how they direct officials.</p>  <p>Still, he added that if his team was confident that Trump was clear of any possible obstruction, it would explicitly state so.</p>  <p>&quot;Based on the facts and the applicable legal standards, we are unable to reach that judgment,&quot; the report says.</p>  <p>The version released to the public Thursday redacts certain material, including information pertaining to ongoing cases, and while Attorney General William Barr said ahead of its release that an unredacted version would be made available to a select group of bipartisan lawmakers, House Judiciary Committee Jerry Nadler subpoenaed the Justice Department for the full report and all underlying information. </p>  <p>&quot;The redactions appear to be significant,&quot; Nadler said in a statement. &quot;We have so far seen none of the actual evidence that the Special Counsel developed to make this case. Even the redacted version of the report outlines serious instances of wrongdoing by President Trump and some of his closest associates. It now falls to Congress to determine the full scope of that alleged misconduct.&quot;</p>  <p>Nadler set a May 1 deadline for the department to comply.

House panel votes to subpoena full Mueller report

             By Michael Hernandez</p>  <p>WASHINGTON (AA) - The House Judiciary Committee voted Wednesday to authorize the subpoena of Special Counsel Robert Mueller's full report, setting up a showdown with the Justice Department.</p>  <p>Attorney General William Barr said late last month he is making redactions to the report alongside Mueller's team, and anticipates it will be released by mid-April. </p>  <p>But Wednesday's 24-17 committee vote authorizes Chairman Jerry Nadler to issue a formal subpoena to the Justice Department for the full, unredacted version of the report.</p>  <p>Nadler said there is &quot;reason to suspect this Administration’s motives&quot; in redacting the report, further suggesting it &quot;isn’t the 'total exoneration' the president claims it to be.&quot;</p>  <p>&quot;The Constitution charges Congress with holding the President accountable for alleged official misconduct,&quot; Nadler said. &quot;That job requires us to evaluate the evidence for ourselves—not the Attorney General’s summary, not a substantially redacted synopsis, but the full report and the underlying evidence.&quot;</p>  <p>Barr had set an April 2 deadline to hand over the full report, but it passed without it being provided, setting the stage for Wednesday's vote. </p>  <p>Mueller's conclusions span 400 pages in addition to supporting materials. They are the culmination of his two-year probe into Russia's attempts to influence the 2016 presidential election, and suspicions the Trump campaign colluded with that effort.</p>  <p>In a four-page letter to Congress last month, Barr said Mueller did not find any evidence Trump's presidential campaign conspired with Russia to influence the election.</p>  <p>Regarding specifically questions of obstruction of justice fueled by the president's action, particularly his firing of former FBI Director James Comey, Barr said the report &quot;does not conclude that the president committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him.&quot;</p>  <p>But in a follow-up letter Barr sent to the Senate and House judiciary chairmen, Barr said his initial missive &quot;was not, and did not purport to be, an exhaustive recounting of the Special Counsel's investigation or report.&quot;